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Your Sales Process – Revenue DRIVER or Sales KILLER?

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The reason for sales process is to drive consistent sales results. Yet, there is a common mistake made that causes the sales process strategy to backfire. In this episode of the Sales Management Minute, learn how to construct a sales process that your sales people love!

Ever watch professional baseball players when they are hitting? Every one of them has a different batting stance. Some hold the bat straight while others hold it at an angle. Some wiggle the bat and others hold it still. Yet, regardless of their batting stance, if you “freeze-frame” right when they swing the bat and make contact with the ball, you see the swings all look similar. The players’ heads are down, the bats are even and their hips are pivoted. Batting coaches never try to make their players use identical stances, but they do make sure the hitting mechanics are sound.

Sales people are very much in the same situation as professional hitters. Sales people aren’t robots and shouldn’t be forced to do everything exactly the same way as their peers. If you’ve tried that approach, you probably weren’t pleased with the revenue results.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m a huge proponent of having a well-defined sales process that the company holds sales people accountable for following. After all, if the process is developed on sales best practices, why wouldn’t the executive team expect their sales people to follow it? Since the company is making an investment in revenue by having the sales people on the team, it is a fair expectation that the sellers follow the company’s sales process.

As big a proponent as I am for process, I’m equally passionate about providing sales people with the opportunity to be creative. The sales process should provide a success framework, but it should not be so tightly structured that sales people lose the ability to be innovative. It’s a delicate balance…no doubt.

See you next time on the Sales Management Minute.

Lee B. Salz is a leading sales management strategist specializing in helping companies build scalable, high-performance sales organizations through hiring the right salespeople, effectively onboarding them, and aligning their sales activities with business objectives through process, metrics and compensation. He is the Founder and CEO of Sales Architects, Business Expert Webinars and The Revenue Accelerator. Lee has authored several books including award-winning,  best-seller “Hire Right, Higher Profits.” He is a results-driven sales management consultant and a passionate, dynamic speaker . Lee can be reached at lsalz@SalesArchitects.net or 763.416.4321.